Author Archive

The Paris attacks in context

Written by Olivia Arigho-Stiles. Posted in Current features, Features

The attacks that engulfed Paris last week have profoundly shaken a continent and left a mood of grim resignation in the French capital. Scores were killed in a chilling series of attacks on bars, restaurants, a concert hall and a stadium, in one of the worst atrocities on French soil since the 1961 Algerian Massacre. At the same time, last week dozens more were killed in bomb blasts in Beirut.

Reluctant Europeans? Britain and the EU referendum

Written by Olivia Arigho-Stiles. Posted in Current features, Features

In 2017 Britain will vote in a referendum on whether to leave this European Union. Derided as the awkward partner since it joined the EU in 1973, Britain’s relationship with the EU has long been lukewarm. Like a standoffish party guest munching on the hors d’oeuvres but eschewing small talk, Britain it is assumed, has never fully reconciled itself to true union with its Continental neighbours.

Photo by DAVID ILIFF. License: CC-BY-SA 3.0 Source: Wikimedia Commons

Navigating change from above and below

Written by Olivia Arigho-Stiles. Posted in Current profiles, Profiles

What is the relationship between agency and institutional change? Does the former lead to the latter, when and how? And what impact does this have on inequality? Probing these questions, alongside many others, is Professor Klarita Gërxhani, Chair in Sociology at the EUI’s Department of Political and Social Sciences, who joined the faculty at the […]

Between occident and orient: North Africa before colonialism

Written by Olivia Arigho-Stiles. Posted in Current profiles, Profiles

The Arab Spring, beginning in 2010 with the Tunisian revolution, was a period of revolutionary transformation for the North Africa region. Its participants rejected the authoritarian rule of the postcolonial era and reclaimed their city streets and squares to demand meaningful political emancipation. Some commentators have hence identified parallels between the decolonisation struggles of the […]

The Right to the City: urban space today

Written by Olivia Arigho-Stiles. Posted in Current features, Features

From Walter Benjamin to Virginia Woolf, cities have captured the imagination of philosophers, artists and critics grappling with the condition of (post)modernity. Oscillating between depictions of the city as a realm of Dickensian slums, vice and deprivation on the one hand, and a utopian vision of ordered social progress on the other, in recent years the urban space has also loomed large in policy-centred debates about economic growth, devolved governance and transnational capitalism.

Green and clean? Lord Stern on COP21 and the world economy

Written by Olivia Arigho-Stiles. Posted in Current features, Features

”We know that the sum total of the emissions that are indicated for 2013 are too high for [the target of] 2°C. For me the test of success in Paris is not that by itself, but is learning from that, recognizing that there is a big gap and therefore discussing carefully and credibly how we raise our ambition beyond Paris. So in other words, Paris is the beginning of a process.”

Nationalism outside the nation: Palestinian refugees and political identity

Written by Olivia Arigho-Stiles. Posted in Current publications, Publications

Revolutionary times make revolutionary people, we might assume, and especially in the fraught terrain of the Israel-Palestine conflict. But as Luigi Achilli contends in his recently published book Palestinian Refugees and Identity: Nationalism, Politics and the Everyday (London, I.B. Tauris, 2015) examining political (dis)engagement among Palestinian refugees living in camps such as al-Wihdat in Jordan, actually sometimes the […]

The Health of Nations: Applying competition law to healthcare

Written by Olivia Arigho-Stiles. Posted in Current profiles, Profiles

Healthcare has emerged as a political hot-potato for European societies, especially as economic troubles have levied strain on its funding. In the UK, the National Health Service (NHS), which provides free and universal healthcare at the point of access, is considered a veritable institution in itself, inextricably bound up with the post-war humanitarian ideals it […]