On The Uses of History for Life

Written by Ellen Halliday. Posted in Current profiles, Profiles

Historian Kate Brown

‘We don‘t like to look at the wreckage of our creative destruction,’ she says. ‘But I’m trying to inspire people to think about the past and present in more nuanced ways. I’m trying to empower them to do something’. The communities of the Pripat marshes have survived calamity after calamity. In their determined resilience, Brown sees not pitiable peasants but unlikely heroes: ‘guides to our future, as we figure out how to live with a radically altered climate and planet encased in toxins’.

Shifting Discourse: From Sympathy to Stigma

Written by Olivia Arigho-Stiles. Posted in Current profiles, Profiles

Ruth Wodak

In Europe, the influx of asylum seekers last year was initially accompanied by an outpouring of heartfelt public sympathy. Ordinary citizens offered up clothes, toiletries and even their spare rooms to asylum seekers. But in recent months, policymakers, reacting to their polities, have hardened their stance to favour the expulsion of refugees rather than open arms.

Navigating change from above and below

Written by Olivia Arigho-Stiles. Posted in Current profiles, Profiles

What is the relationship between agency and institutional change? Does the former lead to the latter, when and how? And what impact does this have on inequality? Probing these questions, alongside many others, is Professor Klarita Gërxhani, Chair in Sociology at the EUI’s Department of Political and Social Sciences, who joined the faculty at the […]

Between occident and orient: North Africa before colonialism

Written by Olivia Arigho-Stiles. Posted in Current profiles, Profiles

The Arab Spring, beginning in 2010 with the Tunisian revolution, was a period of revolutionary transformation for the North Africa region. Its participants rejected the authoritarian rule of the postcolonial era and reclaimed their city streets and squares to demand meaningful political emancipation. Some commentators have hence identified parallels between the decolonisation struggles of the […]

The Health of Nations: Applying competition law to healthcare

Written by Olivia Arigho-Stiles. Posted in Current profiles, Profiles

Healthcare has emerged as a political hot-potato for European societies, especially as economic troubles have levied strain on its funding. In the UK, the National Health Service (NHS), which provides free and universal healthcare at the point of access, is considered a veritable institution in itself, inextricably bound up with the post-war humanitarian ideals it […]

The roar of protest

Written by Olivia Arigho-Stiles. Posted in Current profiles, Profiles

In its relatively short history, the European Union has been no stranger to dissenting voices, and they don’t come much more vociferous than Jerome Roos. The fourth year SPS researcher at the EUI is examining the Greek debt crisis in comparative-historical perspective―  “The basic question I seek to answer is why heavily indebted peripheral countries […]

What makes an intergovernmental forum emerge from the shadows?

Written by Nicholas Barrett. Posted in Current profiles, Profiles

These are called intergovernmental forums. They operate outside the traditional EU framework and have raised serious questions about legitimacy and transparency. But over time these disparate forums have slowly and quietly crept out of the shadows and into public life, becoming noisy actors on the European stage. So why are groups that were designed to stay backstage becoming so conspicuous? One man who might know the answer is Lewis Miller, a British researcher in the department of political and social sciences.

Welfare chauvinism and the progressive’s dilemma

Written by Nicholas Barrett. Posted in Current profiles, Profiles

How can robust and dependable welfare states be maintained in diverse societies? It sounds as if it shouldn’t be a problem, but many are now starting to worry that multiculturalism has inadvertently undermined the foundations of our shared sense of responsibility. “This has been called the progressive’s dilemma” says Professor Will Kymlicka, “that there has to be a trade-off between recognition of diversity and the welfare state.”