The crisis of liberal democracy and what it means for the Global South

Written by Anchalee Rueland. Posted in Current opinions, Opinions

Anchalee Rueland

Europe and the US have long held themselves as beacons for developing democracies around the world. […] But recent EU and US failures (immigration crises, border closings, racially-biased police violence, inequality, Brexit, etc.) are discouraging young democracies’ pursuit of liberal democratic institutions, and these developing countries are growing impatient with what they see as hypocritical preaching from the democratic ‘West’.
Anchalee Rueland is a Ph.D. candidate in SPS. She spent 8 months in Southeast Asia carrying out fieldwork on norm conflicts, and is currently writing a thesis entitled ‘Norms In Conflict: Non-interference vs Protection of Human Rights in Southeast Asia.’

President Trump: the consequences for Europe’s foreign, security and defence policy

Written by Ulrich Krotz. Posted in Current opinions, Opinions

Ulrich Krotz

During the electoral campaign, Donald Trump relied less on foreign policy, security, and defence advisors than any major party nominee in the past 70 years, making the shape and direction of U.S. foreign policy under his administration uncertain and difficult to predict. What might the election of Donald Trump mean for Europe and Europeans? Professor Ulrich Krotz, Chair in International Relations in the Department of Political and Social Sciences and the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, sheds some light on a situation that is anything but clear.

Thinking about Hungary in the time of Trump and Brexit

Written by Béla Greskovits. Posted in Current opinions, Opinions

Bela Greskovits

RSCAS visiting scholar and Professor of International Relations at the Central European University in Budapest Béla Greskovits reflects on the robust performance of the populist Fidesz party in Hungary. He points out the cultural weaknesses of the liberal-left in countries such as the US, France, and the UK, indicating where illiberalism has found fertile ground to take root.

A tragedy for transatlantic relations

Written by Richard Maher. Posted in Current opinions, Opinions

Richard Maher

European leaders and publics today are no doubt struggling to comprehend the implications of Trump’s victory for Europe and for world politics more broadly. Dr Richard Maher, Research Fellow at the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies’ Global Governance Programme, gives his perspective in an op-ed on the result of the American elections.

Brigid Laffan on Brexit

Written by Jacqueline Gordon. Posted in Current opinions, Opinions

‘It is a deeply historical moment, with unknown and unknowable outcomes,’ explains Professor Brigid Laffan, Director of the European University Institute’s Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, referring to the UK’s historic decision to withdraw its membership from the European Union.

Will Brexit be a ‘game-changer’ for the EU?

Written by Author. Posted in Current opinions, Opinions, Uncategorised

Professor Brigid Laffan, Director of the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies and Director of the Global Governance Programme at the EUI and Professor Ramon Marimon, Pierre Werner Chair at the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies and Joint Chair in Economics and the RSCAS, give EUI Times brief opinions on what Brexit would entail.

Gender Exploitation in the Agricultural Sector

Written by Author. Posted in Current opinions, Opinions

Letizia Palumbo is Research Associate at the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies Global Governance Program in the Cultural Pluralism research area. She is affiliated with the DemandAT research project. She is also a Post-doctoral Researcher in Comparative Law at the University of Palermo.

Desperately searching for solidarity in EU asylum policies

Written by Author. Posted in Current opinions, Opinions

It remains woefully clear that the EU has neglected solidarity in its asylum and borders policies despite constitutionalisation by the Lisbon Treaty. Those policies were dominated by the idea of responsibility, with the Dublin regulation establishing that States must cope with their asylum seekers arriving at their borders.This principle, at odds with the idea of a European approach, led to a political debate where hypocrisy became the guiding principle.